9E Tutor Group

From completing a Persuasive Writing and Oral Presentation Common Assessment Task to a Creative Writing one… What does success look like?

Year 9 Narrative Writing

CAT Task Description

Pick a prompt and write a narrative of 500-800 words. Use the planning template attached for your draft. You may type or hand write your final copy.  

Note: you have already been provided with these prompts throughout the unit. 

Write a 150-200 word statement of intention which explains some of your authorial choices. You can write your reflections into the template attached. 

What’s happening in the tutor group this week?

NAPLAN PREP INTEGRATED WITH CLASS WORK:

Reading the whole text using metaphorical thinking and the Inferential Iceberg.

  • Why use metaphors to understand ideas in the first place?
    • Case Study 1: Charlie Brown & Lucy
    • Case Study 2: The Captain On The Titanic
  • Understand synonyms for EXPLICIT and IMPLICIT. Creating a SYNONYM TREE

Understanding the rubric for completing a creative writing Common Assessment Task (CAT) – Or, connecting ‘Big Learning Outcomes’, NAPLAN and life-long learning.

  • Characterisation
  • Narrative Structure and elements
  • Language Conventions: Vocabulary (Show don’t tell)
  • Language Conventions: Punctuation, Spelling, Paragraphs and Grammar
  • The Writing Process 
  • Written explanation

Completing your CAT and understanding its relationship with NAPLAN.

AudienceThe writer’s capacity to orient, engage and affect the reader
Text structureThe organisation of narrative features including orientation, complication and resolution into an appropriate and effective text structure
IdeasThe creation, selection and crafting of ideas for a narrative
Character and settingCharacter: The portrayal and development of character
Setting: The development of a sense of place, time and atmosphere
VocabularyThe range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices
CohesionThe control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word associations)
ParagraphingThe segmenting of text into paragraphs that assists the reader to negotiate the narrative
Sentence structureThe production of grammatically correct, structurally sound and meaningful sentences
PunctuationThe use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text
SpellingThe accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

Standards assessed in English Learning Outcomes

Reading & Viewing

Explore and reflect on personal understanding of the world and significant human experience gained from interpreting various representations of life matters in texts (VCELT437)

Writing

Experiment with the ways that language features, image and sound can be adapted in literary texts (VCELT447)

Create literary texts, including hybrid texts, that innovate on aspects of other texts, including through the use of parody, allusion and appropriation (VCELT448)

The Year 9 Narrative Writing Rubric

Rubric ElementsNot ShownEmergingBeginningCompetentProficient
Students can recall key knowledge and skills, with teacher and peer support.Students are beginning to identify and use key knowledge and skillsStudents are able to apply key understandings and skills.Students are able to analyse and justify key knowledge and skill
01234
CharacterisationInsufficient EvidenceNarrative contains multiple characters. Narrative contains at least one character who can be identified as traditionally ‘good’ or ‘evil’.


The characterisation is supported by at least one inclusion of dialogue. 
Narrative contains a clearly identifiable protagonist and/or antagonist.  

The characterisation is supported by effective dialogue that does one or more of the following: helps move the plot forward, describes a character, conveys a sense of time, creates suspense or conflict, conveys a sense of place, reveals a character’s thoughts or conveys a moral. 
Narrative contains a thoroughly developed protagonist and/or antagonist.  

The characterisation is supported by frequent and effective dialogue that serves many of the following purposes: helps move the plot forward, describes a character, conveys a sense of time, creates suspense or conflict, conveys a sense of place, reveals a character’s thoughts or conveys a moral. 
Narrative Structure and ElementsInsufficient EvidenceThe narrative features a complication, and an attempted orientation and/or resolution.
 
The narrative has an identifiable orientation, complication and resolution.

Narrative perspective is inconsistent. 
The narrative has an identifiable orientation, complication and resolution. These are explored in thorough detail. 

Student maintains a consistent narrative perspective throughout their piece. 
Not applicable. 
Language Conventions: Vocabulary (Show don’t tell)Insufficient EvidenceSome descriptive language has been used, including a range of verbs, adverbs and adjectives. Descriptive language, including a range of verbs, adverbs and adjectives have been used throughout the narrative.

Some different literary devices have been used, including simile or imagery.
A range of descriptive language has been used to ‘show, don’t tell’ effectively.

A range of different literary devices have been used frequently throughout the narrative.
A wide variety of descriptive and sophisticated language has been used consistently throughout the narrative. The piece contains a wide variety of literary devices including metaphor, juxtapositions or allusions.
Language Conventions: Punctuation, Spelling, Paragraphs and GrammarInsufficient EvidenceSome correct use of sentence level punctuation (capital letter, full stops, commas, questions and explanation marks) and most common words are spelt correctly.Sentence level punctuation, grammar and spelling is mostly correct throughout the piece. Writing is clear.
Correct punctuation, including dialogue and colons, grammar and spelling are consistently used throughout the piece. Writing is clear and fluent.All punctuation, grammar and spelling are correct and used to enhance the effect on the reader.
The Writing Process Insufficient EvidenceSome evidence of planning and drafting.Evidence of planning, drafting and editing in the final copy.Evidence of thorough planning using the planning document, drafting and editing including conferencing and revising before producing the final copy.Evidence of thorough planning using the planning document, drafting and editing including a willingness to make changes based on feedback before producing final document.
Written explanationInsufficient EvidenceQuestions have been answered in simple sentences. Student can give at least one reason as to why they wrote their narrative in this wayQuestions have been answered with detail and some examples from the narrative. Student can give some brief reasons as to why they wrote their narrative this way. The questions have been answered in detail with evidence from the narrative and organised into a paragraph or paragraphs.

Student can provide multiple reasons as to why they wrote their narrative this way. 
The questions have been used as a guide to construct detailed paragraphs which are reflective and use numerous examples from their narrative.

Student can provide detailed reasons as to why they wrote their narrative this way. 

The work for the week will be posted here. When the time line runs out, it will be archived and the next time line will be activated.

How is ‘proficient’ described?

Characterisation

Narrative contains thoroughly developed protagonist and/or antagonist. This means the writer deliberately depicts the characteristics and features of a character’s

  • physical appearances
  • emotions and personality
  • motivations and viewpoint  

Characterisation also makes effective use of dialogue for

  • moving the plot forward,
  • describing the character’s identity, and the personality of another character
  • conveying a sense of time and place,
  • creating suspense or conflict,
  • reveal a character’s thoughts and moral beliefs and values

.

Narrative Structure & Elements

The narrative has an identifiable

  • orientation or exposition through which the writer ‘hooks’ or engages the reader into the world of the story
  • complications in the body of the story in which conflicts and tensions are developed to hold the readers’ interest and
  • resolution or denouement in which the issues or moral conflicts that have occurred in the story are transformed, changed or even set aside for another day.  

Writers aim to maintain consistent narrative perspective or through line throughout their story. 

Language Conventions – Vocabulary

A wide variety of descriptive and sophisticated language (also referred to as figurative language) has been used consistently throughout the narrative.

The piece contains a wide variety of literary devices including

  • metaphors and similes,
  • analogy and allusions
  • juxtaposition and irony

Writers NEVER stop reaching for a dictionary and thesaurus for their storytelling. Here’s a free online dictionary/ thesaurus.

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/

Language Conventions – Punctuation, Spelling, Paragraphs and Grammar

The vital language conventions around

  • correct punctuation, including dialogue and colons,
  • grammar and
  • spelling are consistently used throughout the piece. .

When punctuation, grammar and spelling are correct, writing is clear and fluent. This means the editing process in narrative writing is crucial to enhancing the effect on the reader.

The Writing Process

Evidence of

  • thorough planning using the planning document,
  • drafting and editing including a willingness to make changes based on feedback before producing final document.

These are the hallmarks of a good writer, that is, one who is interested in engaging readers into the unique experience of their storytelling.

Written Explanation

Writers are often asked to justify why and what they created in their stories.

The questions guide you to construct detailed paragraphs which are reflective and use numerous examples from what you’ve done in your narrative.

You provide detailed reasons as to why you wrote the narrative as you did.